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Joseph   PHIPPS

Joseph PHIPPS[1]

Male 1640 - 1716  (75 years)

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  • Name Joseph PHIPPS 
    Born 16 Oct 1640  Reeding, Berks, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Birth Abington, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 13 Oct 1716  Abbington, Twp, Montgomery County, PA. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I13009  Lucius
    Last Modified 13 Jun 2004 

    Father John PHIPPS, Jr.,   b. 1607, Abington, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother MARY, (--?--),   b. Abt 1610, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1637  Abington, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4508  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah BINFIELD,   b. 1 Feb 1640, Reeding, Berks, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Nov 1725, Abbington, Twp, Montgomery County, PA. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 1665  St Lawrence Church, Reeding, Berks, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Isaiah (Josiah) PHIPPS,   b. 6 Aug 1668, Reeding, Berks, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1748, Philadelphia, PA. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     2. John PHIPPS
     3. Lydia PHIPPS
     4. Joseph Jr. PHIPPS,   b. 27 Jun 1671
     5. Ann PHIPPS
     6. Benjamin PHIPPS
     7. Thomas PHIPPS
     8. Zephaniah PHIPPS
     9. William PHIPPS
     10. Sarah PHIPPS
    Family ID F4509  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • William Penn conveyed to John Tanner of Love Lane, London, England, 500 acres in Pennsylvania, by deed of February 3, 1681 and the like quantity to William Tanner of Uxbridge, co. of Middlesex, England. These two convey their 1,000 acres to Benjamin Clark, citizen and stationer of London by their deeds of lease and release, dated 20 & 21 June 1688, and the last named granted 500 acres thereof for 10 pounds to Joseph Phipps, tallow chandler, late of Reading in the co. of Berkshire, per his deed of July 13, 1683, which last is recorded at Philadelphia. Warrants for a total of 5,850 acres in Pennsylvania, in addition to three lots in the city of Philadelphia, were granted to Joseph Phipps. May 9, 1683 - from the board of property a warrant for 250 acres in Abington townshipl which was the upper part of Philadelphia Co., which was patented to him September 7, 1686. He bought 250 acres adjacent, from Robert Ewer per deed of August 7, 1690. (Phipps Quarterly Apr. - June 1978)
      On September 06, 1682, he was present at a monthly meeting at Burlington, N.J., member of Provincial Assembly Chester Co.
      January 02, 1708/09, will written - will proved October 13, 1716
      Occupation: tallow chandler, farmer
      Joseph Phipps, founder of the family of this country, lived in England at or near Reading. He became a member of the Society of Friends and came to this country with his family about 1682. He was a friend and associate of William Penn and was a member of the first Assembly of Penn's colony, which met first at Upland, now Chester, and later Philadelphia. He is said to have operated a store in Philadelphia at Second and Sassafras (now Race Street). He received from William Penn deeds to valuable lands, copies which were read at the Phipps Centennial Reunion, held in August 1897. These lands included a grant of 300 acres near Abington meeting and Jenkintown, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, where he settled. It is said that Joseph Phipps and his neighbor, Richard Jenkins, formed the committee that built the original Abington Meetinghouse towards the end of the seventeenth century.
      Family tradition says Joseph cane with William Penn but the book "Welcome Claimants" says his sister Sarah's husband John Houlston, was on the Welcome, but the Phipps family aren't listed or on other ships.
      When William Penn came into the possession of Pennsylvania, three counties were formed - Philadelphia, Bucks, and Chester. Montgomery County, where the Phipps property was, was formed from Philadelphia.
      Abigton is one of the earliest Friends' Meetings in Pennsylvania. There is an account of it's early story in the History of Montgomery County, PA, edited by Theodore W. Bean in 1884, from which the following extract is quoted: "About 1691 the members of Oxford Meeting-house having joined the Keithians, the Friends continued their worship at private houses until John Barnes, by deed dated 5th of Second Month 1697, vested one hundred and twenty acres in Abington township, near the present borough of Jenkintown, in trustees for the benefit of a meetin house, and the maintainance of a school, which was willingly accepted, and thus led to its present location. On the 27th of Tenth Month following William Jenkins gave a relation about Friends in Philadelphia giving assistance toward building a new meeeting-house at Abington, when the aforesaid Joseph Phipps were appointed to proceed there the following month for securing additional aid. On the 25th of Twelfth Month, 1699 the collection of the meeting amounting to 5 pounds 10 shillings 6 pence were paid to the treasurer Everard Bolton and Joseph Phipps, Thomas Canby and William Jenkins were appointed by the Monthly Meeting to inspect the accounts of the aforesaid and of Samuel Cart, 'concerning ye building of ye meeting-house' for which they had been employed. The committee reported to the Monthly Meeting 24th of Fourth Month, 1700, that they had examined the accounts and find that there is due Everard Bolton 18shillings 6 pence, which was ordered to be paid. The meeting house was the second build in the present limits of the sounty, being preceded by the one in Lower Merion by only two years."
      Regarding the burial ground adjacent to the Abington Meeting House:- "The graveyard to the northwest of the meeting-house was considerably enlarged between the years 1842 and 1844 and now comprises an area of several acres. Here repose beneath common stones some of the earliest settlers in this vicinity with several generations of descendants. Inscriptions can be found only on the latter stones..."
      The township of Abington is situated in the extreme southeastern section of the county, and is bounded on the northwest by Upper Dublin, northeast by Moreland, southeast by Philadelphia, and southwest by Springfield, Cheltenham and the borough of Jenkintown. The name of Abington has been applied from several parishes so called and formed more than nine hundred years ago, in Northampton and Cambridgeshire, England... From Thomas Holmes' map of of original surveys, probably filled up before 1696, we secure some additional information as to the first taking up of the lands. Beginning at the present Philadelphia line, on the south side of Susquehanna Street road: Thomoas Livesay, Robert Fairman, Walter King, Richard Dungworth, William Chamberlain, Joseph Phipps...
      From a return made by the constable ar the order of Thomas Penn, Abington was reported in 1734 to contain forty-two resident landholders and taxables (no Phipps)...
      William Jenkins, the founder of the family bearing the name in this section, is stated to have come from Wales, and must have resided in the township at least as late as 27th of Tenth Month, 1697, when he was appointed with Joseph Phipps to solicit subscriptions in Philadelphia toward the erection of the new meeting house...
      Benjamin Lay, the eccentric philanthropist...is stated to have been a member of the Society of Friends, and after the death of his wife sought out a retired spot about a quarter of a mile east of Abington Meeting-hose, belonging to John Phips, now the estate of the late Joshua Francis Fisher. He improved a natural excavation on the hillside, so as to afford him a commodious apartment...
      Assement of Abington for 1780. Peter Phipps 199 a, 2 horses, 1 cow... Joseph Phipps Jr., lab, 1 cow....Joseph Phipps Sr. 70 acres, 2 horses...."
      (From A Brief History of the Phipps Family in Venango County In Celebration of Their Two Hundred Years in Venango County - by Nancy Byers Romig.)
      Minutes of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. 26th of 2 Mo. 1695, at Robert Ewer's. Richard Gove & Evan Morris are desired to take care that the subscriptions may be carried on relating to Joseph Phipps and bring the same in to the next meeting.
      Last day of 3rd Month, 1695, at Robert Ewer's house. The friends appointed to Collect the subscription for Joseph Phips's assitance by reason of his house being burned have done the same, they are desired to pay it to R. E. that the said Joseph Phips may have it, the sum being 22 pounds 12.7.
      28th of 4th Month 1695 at Robert Ewer's. The money collected for Joseph Phips was paid in to Robert Ewer and the said Ewer paid it to Joseph Phipps and took his receipt for the same.
      30th of 6th Month 1695 at Robert Ewer's. There being a complaint brought to this meeting by Joseph Phipps against Richard Sutton in some manner depending between them, this meeting being informed that Joseph Phips have dealt orderly with him requested... to speak to Richard Sutton in order to End the said difference, and make report thereof to the next meeting.
      27th of 7th Month 1695 at Robert Ewer's. Matter depending between Joseph Phips and Richard Sutton is ended. (From A Brief History of the Phipps Family in Venango County In Celebration of Their Two Hundred Years in Venango County - by Nancy Byers Romig.)
      Joseph Phipps, tallow chandler, "Late of Reading Co. of Berks., " in 1683 bought from B. C. (Benjamin Clark), citizen and stationer in London, 500 acres to be laid out in PA. The following year he obtained a warrant for a 25 foot lot on west side of Front, between Mulberry and Sassafras Streets, which extended west to Second St. This property he daily improved and built on" but in 1693 sold it to Richard Sutton and removed to Cheltenham township.
      Deed book C 2-3 90:12 July 1683. Benjamin Clark to Joseph Phipps. Warrants & Surveys, I, 952. The ground Phipps and Sutton held comprises ground now occupied by houses on north side of Elfreth's Alley.
      William Penn conveyed to John Tanner of Love Lane, London, Eng., 500 acres in PA., by Deed of 3 Feb. 1681, and the like quantity to William Tanner of Uxbridge, Co. of Middlesex, Eng. These two conveyed their 1,000 acres to Benjamin Clark, citizen and stationer of London by their Deeds of Lease and Release, dated 20 and 21 Jun. 1688, and the last named granted 500 acres thereof for 10 pounds to Joseph Phipps, tallow chandler, late of Reading in the County of Berks., per his Deed of 13 July 1683, which last is recorded at Philadelphia. Warrants for a total of 5,850 acres in PA., in addition to these three lots in the City of Philadelphia were granted to Joseph Phipps (PA archives, 3-2). At the monthly meeting of 6 Sept. 1682 at Burlington, N.J., Joseph Phipps appears and was appointed on a committee; he appears as a member of the Provincial Assembly from Chester Co., PA. On 9 May 1683 Joseph Phipps obtained from the Board of Property a warrant for 250 acres in Abington Tn., which was the upper part of Philadelphia Co., which was patented to him 7 Sept. 1686. He bought 250 acres adjacent from Robert Ewer per Deed of 7 Aug. 1690. Joseph Phipps; will was dated 2nd day, 1st month
      1709 and proved 13 Oct. 1716.
      1st Mo. 1689-90. Behalf of James Kingsburrie - grant him 25 foot lott in Dellaware front st...lyes between Benjamin Chambers and Joseph Phipps... Minute Book D.
      "D" - 5th 5th mo. 1690. Joseph Phips requests Benjamin Chambers might have the bank before his, the said Phips' front lott on Dellaware, he having acknowledged that the said Benjamin Chambers hath made him satisfaction for his Right therein.
      "G" - Deed dated 21 June 1683, sold all their (proprietary) 1,000 acres to Benjamin Clark, who by Deed dated 12 June 1683, conveyed 500 acres, a Moiety thereof to Joseph Phips, whose Share has been reckoned the Purchase of John Tanner and the other Moiety remain'g to B. Clark the Purchase of William Tanner. In right of said John's Purchase there has been laid out to the said Joseph Phips in one Tract 300 acres in the County of Philad'a, neat Nich. Skull's land, on which he requests a Resurvey and a Warrant for 8 acres of Lib. Land to himself and the like Quantity to Benjamin Clark.
      Granted.
      Benjamin Chambers several times requested Propr'ty....consideration of Barrenness of the Tract of Land laid out in county of Chester for 2000 acres to the Kentish Purchasers, He would be pleased to grant him at a moderate rate to take upon the No. Side of said Tract for himself and Henry Green, 2 of the said Purchasers, 150 acres of vacant Land and at the Eastern End of said Tract 200 acres for Peter Blan and James Hunt...formerly laid out to Anthony Westar and Burgess, and by them deserted...Benj., upon Survey...., shall pay After the Rate of 12 pounds per 100...2 Warrants be granted. Signed a Warrant to Joseph Phips, ordered today.
      "G" p. 268 16th of 12th 1701. Benjamin Clark, purchaser of 1000 acres....Warrant dated 28th 4 mo. 1686...Lott 20 foot in breadth, bounded North with Sam'll Fox, and South with Rich'd Sutton's, formerly Jos. Phips.The Prop'ry having by 3 Several Warr'ts now in the Surveyor's Office, granted to Joseph Phips in 1683 and '84.
      "G" p 313-315. Joseph Phips, Junr., of Co. of Chester, Seated on tract laid out for 200 acres, as is said, to George Woodyear, in upper Providence, purchased by said George....at his first arrival, for payment of which said Joseph produces a certificate....George requests Resurvey... (From A Brief History of the Phipps Family in Venango County In Celebration of Their Two Hundred Years in Venango County - by Nancy Byers Romig.)
      Joseph Phipps, an English Quaker tallow-chandler who underwent repeated imprisonment for his faith, immigrated to Pennsylvania where he lived for over 30 years; he accumulated a substantial land estate but was relatively inactive politically.
      Born in 1640 in Reading, Berkshire, England, Phipps had become a Quaker by January 1661, when he was imprisoned for refusing to swear the oath of allegience. He was imprisoned at least six more times between June 1662 and July 1666 for attending illegal religious meetings; although sentenced in July 1666 to be transported to the colonies, Phipps remained in jail until released by royal pardon in 1672. His wife, Sarah Phipps, having been imprisoned in 1671, was also released at that time. Phipps suffered his final incarceration from October 1675 to February 1676, again for refusing to swear the oath of allegiance. A member of Reading Monthly Meeting, Phipps attended at least 21 sessions between 1669 and 1682; in 1680 he signed a certificate against the behavior of Thomas Curtis, who lead a separatist movement from the monthly meeting.
      Presumably tired of the constant harassment, Phipps immigrated with his family to Chester County, Pennsylvania, apparently in 1682, for he represented that county in the 1683 Assembly, where he served on a committee to determine fines on members absent for entire sessions. He also served on a trial jury at Chester County court in June 1683 and on a grand jury at Philadelphia County court on March 1686, although he was fined in June 1686 for absenting himself from a trial jury. Aside from two brief stints as a tax collector, Phipps does not appear to have engaged in further public service. Phipps apparently had rights through several purchases to at least 1500 acres in Pennsylvania, which were located in Concord and Upper Providence townships, Chester County, and in the area of Cheltenham and Abington townships, Philadelphia County. He also owned two Philadelphia city lots, along Front and Third streets between Mulberry and Sassafras streets; he resided on the Front Street lot until April 1693, when he moved to Abington. Phipps sold his other Philadelphia city lot in 1695, the year in which his home and outbuildings at Abington burned down, prompting Philadelphia Monthly Meeting to subscribe almost (L-symbol)23 for his assistance. In 1690 Phipps had also sold 400 acres in Kent County that he had acquired three years earlier from William Berry.
      Although Sarah Phipps became a Quaker minister after 1700, her husband does not appear to have been particularly active among Friends. A member of Abington Monthly Meeting after 1694, Phipps was one of the two Friends called upon in 1698 to inspect the behavior at Cheltenham Friends' youth meetings and was one of five Friends appointed in 1700 to inspect the accounts of the building of Abington meetinghouse.
      Between 1706 and 1708 Phipps conveyed both his Abington home and 284 acres to his son John, while in 1710-11 he conveyed another 150 acres to John and 150 acres to another son, Isaiah. Phipps drew up his will on 1 April 1709, leaving the bulk of his personal estate to his wife and son John, the latter to act as executor, with Samuel Cart and Thomas Canby as overseers. The will was probated on 13, October 1716, two days after his estate was appraised at 45 pounds.
      The Will of Joseph Phipps
      The will of Joseph Phipps of Abington, probated October 13th, 1716. Registrars Office, Philadelphia, Book D 1716. Page 59, No. 76.
      I, Joseph Phipps of the township of Abington in the county of Philadelphia, Yeoman, being in good health and of a sound and perfect memory, calling to remembrance the uncertain state of this transitory life and all flesh must yield unto death when it do please God to call, do make, constitute, ordain and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner following, revoking and annulling by these presents all and every Testament and Testaments, Will and Wills, theretofore made and declared either by word or writing and this is to be taken only for by last will and Testament and none other, and now for settling of my Temporal Estate and such goods, chattels, and debts, as it has pleased God to bestow upon me, I do order, give and dispose the same in manner and form following, that is to say, First, I will that all those debts as I owe in right and contious (sp?) to any manner of person or persons whatsoever, shall be well and truly paid or cause to be paid within convenient time after my decease by my Executor hereafter named, Imprimis, I do give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Sarah Phipps my best feather bed with all my best furniture and belonging unto it both wooling and Lining, also I do give and bequeath to my said wife Three of my best silver spoons, one warming pan, one Pot and Pothooks, one Gettel, Two Pewter dishes, Two porringers, six plates, one Table, 2 board, Two chairs, one looking Glass, Two of my best cows and two of my Sheep, also I do give and bequeath unto my said wife Ten pounds a year during her natural life to be paid out of my plantation by my said Executor hereafter named, that is to say fifty shillings a quarter in current silver money of Pennsylvania. My will is that my said wife shall have the use of Two Rooms of my house which she shall like best during her life, and further my will is that my said executor, hereafter named doe provide hay and fodder for ye Two Cows and Two Sheeps, I bequeath unto my said wife and fodder them therewith and that my said Executor provide and bring firewood to the door for my said wife to burn during her life and my will is further that if my wife shall have occasion of any more of my household goods that my said executor shall let her have the use of them during her life. Item, I give and bequeath unto my son Joseph Phipps, six shillings of lawful money in Pennsylvania, Item, I give and bequeath unto my said John Phipps my plantation in the Township of
      Abington containing about one hundred and seventy four acres of land be it more or less with all the buildings and improvements thereon for him and his heirs forever. Item. All the rest of my chattels and goods not here, both real and personal I give and bequeath to my son John Phipps whom I make my whold and sole executor of this my last Will and Testament and I do hereby nominate and appoint my loving friends Samuel Cart and Thomas Canby of the township of Abington, overseers of this my last will and Testament desiring them to see this my last will performed. In Witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal this first day of the Second month One Thousand Seven Hundred and Nine (1709). Signed, Sealed, declared and Published Joseph Phipps in the presence of Henry Bennett Morris Morris Mathias Tissen William Powell
      Be it Remembered That on ye 13th day of October 1716 the Last Will and
      Testament of Joseph Phipps, Deceased, was proved in due form of Law.
      Probate & Letters of Administration was Granted to John Phipps, Executor therein Named, being first attested well & truly to administer and to bring an Invetory of ye Decedants Estate into ye Register General's office at Philadelphia ye 13th day of November next, and also to Render account when Required.
      Given under ye Seal of said office per Pet. Evard, Reg. General [Book D., page 79, Philadelphia]
      Inventory of all and singular the goods, chattels and creditts of Joseph Phipps senior of Abington in the county of Philadelphia and province of Pennsylvania, deceased. Praised by Thomas Canby and Daniell Thomas. Imprimis
      To Purse and apparell 10
      To one feather bed and furniture 10
      To one flock bed and furniture 5
      To Greate Pewter dishes and 1/2 doz. plates 2
      To one copper and one iron Pot 2
      To two pewter candlesticks and a warming pan 06
      To a pair of Pot Hooks and Hangar 06
      To six chairs, one old chest of Drawers 1 08
      To a close Press and a table 1
      To a looking Glass and one Box iron 12
      To 3 Cows and one Yearling 11
      To 10 sheep, 4 shoats and 4 pigs 2
      ___________
      45 12
      (From A Brief History of the Phipps Family in Venango County In Celebration of Their Two Hundred Years in Venango County - by Nancy Byers Romig.)

  • Sources 
    1. [S28] Pam Crain Gedcom File, Pam Crain, (March 7, 2003), cra_mey_gedcom.ged.