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Alianore   de Clare

Alianore de Clare[1]

Female 1292 - 1337  (~ 45 years)

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  • Name Alianore de Clare 
    Born Oct 1292  Caerphilly Castle, Caerphilly, Glamorganshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 30 Jun 1337  Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I22205  Lucius
    Last Modified 28 Feb 2005 

    Family Hugh Sespencer, Baron Le Despenser,   b. 1 Mar 1260, Barton, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Married 14 Jun 1306  Westminster, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F8486  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    caerphilly1a.jpg
    caerphilly1a.jpg

    Histories
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    caerphilly1a.bmp
    caerphl-castle.jpg
    caerphl-castle.jpg

  • Notes 
    • http://www.castlewales.com/caerphil.html

      Caerphilly Castle
      Caerphilly Castle in south Wales is one of the largest castles in the United Kingdom. It was built by Gilbert de Clare between the years 1268 and 1271. By 1267 Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, the last native prince of Wales, had become lord of the greater part of Wales. He posed a threat to de Clare, the Anglo Norman lord of Glamorgan and the castle was built in response to this threat.
      Caerphilly is considered to be the earliest and finest example of of the true regular concentric fortification in the British Isles. The water defences are thought to be modelled on those of Kenilworth Castle.


      Caerphilly Castle is one of the great medieval castles of western Europe. Several factors give it this pre-eminence - its immense size (1.2h), making it the largest in Britain after Windsor, its large-scale use of water for defence and the fact that it is the first truly concentric castle in Britain. Of the time of its building in the late 13th century, it was a revolutionary masterpiece of military planning
      One of Henry III's most powerful and ambitious barons, Gilbert de Clare, lord of Glamorgan, built this castle. His purpose was to secure the area and prevent lowland south Wales from falling into the hands of the Welsh leader Llywelyn the Last, who controlled most of mid and north Wales. De Clare built other castles on the northern fringes of his territory for the same purpose, such as Castell Coch. He had seized the upland district of Senghenydd, in which Caerphilly lies, from the Welsh in 1266 to act as a buffer against Llywelyn's southward ambitions. Llywelyn realised the threat and tried but failed to prevent the castle from being built; it was begun on 11 April 1268, was attacked by Llywelyn in 1270, and was begun again in 1271. This time it was completed without hindrance. Its message was not lost on Llywelyn, who retreated northwards. Apart from the remodelling of the great hall and other domestic works in 1322-6 for Hugh le Despenser, no more alterations were carried out, making it a very pure example of late 13th-century military architecture.

  • Sources 
    1. [S86] A History of Wales, John Davies, (1993).