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John   Cary, II

John Cary, II

Male 1610 - 1681  (71 years)

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  • Name John Cary 
    Suffix II 
    Born 1610  Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Immigration 1634  American from Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 31 Oct 1681  Bridgewater Colony, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I25404  Lucius
    Last Modified 3 May 2004 

    Father John Cary, I,   b. 1610, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1681, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Mother Alice Hobson,   b. 1590, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1635, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years) 
    Married 1644 
    Family ID F9061  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth Godfrey,   b. 29 Oct 1620, Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1680, Bridgewater Colony, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Married Jun 1644 
    Children 
     1. John Cary, Jr.,   b. 4 Nov 1645, Duxbury, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1721, Bristol, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     2. Francis Cary,   b. 19 Jan 1646, Duxbury, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1718, Bridgewater Colony, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     3. Elizabeth Cary,   b. 20 Dec 1649, Duxbury, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. James Cary,   b. 28 Mar 1652, Braintree, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1706  (Age 53 years)
     5. Mary Cary,   b. 8 Jul 1654, Duxbury, New Plantation, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Johnathon Cary,   b. 24 Sep 1656, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1695  (Age 38 years)
     7. David Cary,   b. 27 Jan 1658, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1718  (Age 59 years)
     8. Hannah Cary,   b. 30 Apr 1661, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Joseph Cary,   b. 18 Apr 1663, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jan 1722  (Age 58 years)
     10. Rebecca Cary,   b. 30 Mar 1665, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1697  (Age 31 years)
     11. Sarah Cary,   b. 2 Aug 1667, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
     12. Mehitabel Cary,   b. 24 Dec 1670, Bridgewater, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F10008  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Headstones
    John Cary Monument1.gif
    John Cary Monument1.gif
    Monument to John Cary erected on/near his homestead in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts in 1905 by a group of his descendants.

  • Notes 
    • Notes for John Cary II:

      1.) JOHN CARY MASSACHUSETTS (c1610-1669)
      John CARY was born near Bristol, Somersetshire, England, about 1610; came to America about 1634, joined the Plymouth Colony, and made his home at Duxbury, where he had a farm. In 1644 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth GODFREY (who was a carpenter and bridge builder, and in August, 1643, we find his name on the muster roll of the Duxbury Company commanded by Capt. Myles STANDISH; he removed to Bridgewater where he died in 1669; it is thought that the name GODFREY comes from the Duke of Bouillon, the Crusader).

      Concerning John CARY, Moses CARY has this: "Mr. Cary was one of the Proprietors (of Bridgewater), and one of the first settlers, and was very useful among them. The town was incorporated in 1656. Mr. CARY was the first Town Clerk and continued in that office a great number of years.

      At first they settled near together and around where the Town House now stands in West Bridgewater. Mr. CARY's lot was about a 1/4 of a mile east of the Town House and on the farm where Dr. REED lived; and there he spent the remainder of his days, and brought up a great family of children. He had six sons and six daughters. They all lived to grow up and have families and all took to good courses so that it was the saying of some "that there were 12 of 'em and never a Judas among them.' "
      Judge MITCHELL, in his description of Bridgewater, speaking of the first settlers, says; "Mr. CARY was among the most respectable of them, and his family one of the most influential in the town" Elizabeth GODFREY CARY died in 1680 and John CARY died in 1681.

      From JOHN CARY the Plymouth Pilgrim by Seth C. Cary, Boston, MA 1911

      "John , Bridgewater, said to have come from neighb. of Bristol, Eng. at the age of 25, and set down first, 1637, at Duxbury, then hav. gr. of ld. m. June 1644, Elizabeth d. of Francis Godfrey, had John, b. 1645; Francis, 1647; Eliz. 1649; and at Braintree, James, 1652; at Bridgewater, Mary, 1654; Jonathan, 1656; David, 1658; Hannah, 1661; Joseph 1663; Rebecca, 1665; Sarah, 1667; and Mehitable, 1670. He was first town clk. and early his name was written, Carew; but as the Eng. pronounce that name Cary, spell. soon foll. sound. Of his death 2 Nov. 1681 is the date in report, against wh. suspicion of course aris. that for this the identity of James Cary and John Cary has been confound. Eliz. m. William Brett the sec. and Rebecca m. 1685, Samuel Allen the third. "

      2.) Town Officers of Bridgewater, Incorporated June 3, 1656, Indian name NUNKETEST.
      1656 Constable John Carey
      1673-74-75-766-77-78-79 Selectman John Carey
      1656-1681 Town Clerk, John Carey
      Bridgewater Grand Juryman 1672 and 1677

      3.) John Cary was born near Bristol, Somersetshire, England in 1610 (Some say 1608). He was one of a family of eight sons and two daughters. When a youth he was sent by his father to France to be educated, and while there his father died. On returning home he differed with his brothers about the settlement of the estate. He compromised by receiving one hundred pounds as his portion, and immediately sailed for America. This was in 1634.

      4.) He first joined the Plymouth Colony. In 1649 he, with others, purchased of Ousamequin, afterwards known as Massasoit, chief of the Pockanocket Indians, a tract of land about fourteen miles square, embracing what is now the Bridgewaters. This tract was known as Satucket. The deed was made out to Miles Standish and two others, as trustees in behalf of John Cary and fifty-three others. The original is preserved by the old Bridgewater Historical Society, West Bridgewater, Mass.

      5.) The land was paid for with:

      7 coats, a yard and a half in a coat.

      9 hatchets

      8 hoes20 knives

      4 Moose skins

      10 yards and a half of cotton

      6.) The deed is signed by Miles Standish, Samuel Nash, and Constant Southwork.

      7.) The part of the land that John Cary settled was a tract one mile wide by seven miles long. This tract embraced what is now
      the city of Brockton.

      8.) The town of Bridgewater was incorporated in 1656. That year John was chosen constable, the first and only officer elected at that time. The office of constable was second only to that of governor. The constable was the only officer in the town whose duty it was to execute the laws, and his power was almost absolute. He could even arrest on suspicion "without precept," a power scarcely allowed at the present day to the chief magistrate of a nation or state. There were no sheriffs in those days.

      9.) John was elected town clerk the next year, 1657, and held office till he died in 1681, a period of twenty-four years.

      10.) He was prominent among his fellows, was intelligent, well educated and public spirited. He taught the first class in Latin in the colony.

      11.) The original 16 settlers lived in what is now West Bridgewater. Their lots of 6 acres each all abutted on Town River, or as called by the Indians, Nuncketest River. John Cary had two of these lots. The boundary was as follows: on the west was South Street, the old road leading from New Bedford to Boston and laid out in 1668; on the north was Ash Street, and on the other two sides were the river and the cemetery. On this land are two houses, one, the older, built in 1799 on the spot where stood the dwelling of John Cary, the old well being still in use, and the cellar practically the same as then. This house and two acres of land have been willed to Mr. Fred E. Howard of that town for an Old Ladies Home.

      12.) The grave of John Cary can not be located. There is a John Cary Monument erected on his homestead in West Bridgewater, Mass. 1905
      It reads:
      Near this spot was the home of JOHN CARY born in Somersetshire, England He became in 1651 an original proprietor, And honored settler on this River. Was clerk o f the Plantation When the town of Bridgewater was Incorporated, in 1656. He was elected Constable,. The first and only officer of that year. Was town clerk until his death in 1681. Tradition says, He was the first teacher of latin in Plymouth colony. This tablet erected by his descendants in memory Of their historic and noble ancestor.
      13.) Abstracts and Index of the Records of the Inferior Court of Pleas (Suffolk Court held at Boston, Mass.
      1680-1698 January, 5, 1697 (1696/7)
      154. Isaac Bonowrier, London, merchant, vs. John Cary, Bristol, merchant; L90; money due; D. costs.
      157. Richard Chauncey, London, linen draper, vs. John Cary, London, merchant;
      L300; money due; D. costs, app.
      158. Thomas Newton, Boston, gentleman, vs. john Cary, Bristol, merchant;
      L4; money owed; P.L3.6.6, costs.
      April 7, 1696
      136. William Slack, Boston, shipwright, vs. John Carey, Bristol, Merchant; L50; services; P. by default, L40.9.8, costs.
      137. William Stretton, Boston, mariner, vs. John Cary, Bristol, merchant; L10; money owed; P. by default, L5.
      140. John Cary, Bristol, merchant, vs. William Stretton, Boston, mariner, D. costs.
      October 1, 1695
      116. John Cary, London, merchant, vs. William Stretton, Boston, mariner; L1200; breach of contract; D. costs.
      119. John Cary vs. William Ingraham, Bristol; no action entered; D, costs.
      January 1696(1695/6)
      121. John Cary, London, merchant, vs. William Stretton, Boston, mariner; L800; failure to render accounting; D. costs.
      In the same court William III, King of England, vs. Garret Pursley, et al., L30; scire facias for execution of judgment; court granted execution.
      April 2, 1695, sitting
      85. Richard Chauncey, London, merchant, vs. John Cary, Bristol, merchant; L300; goods sold; D. costs, app.
      July 3, 1694
      57. John Cary, London, merchant, vs. Joseph Mallison, Boston merchant.
      September 19, 1693
      35. Richard Chauncey, London, merchant, vs. John Cary, London, merchant.
      14.) Immigrated to Plymouth in 1634.
      15.) In 1643 we find his name of the muster-roll of the Duxbury Co., commanded by Captain Myles Standish.
      16.) Moses Cary in his manuscript wrote; 'The daughters of John Cary: one married a Howard, one Dea. William Brett, one Samuel Allen, one a Thurston and two of them Stanedishes.
      17.) In 1785, one Moses Cary wrote an interesting story of the Cary's which is worthy of preservation. He begins with John Cary, the founder of the family that came to Duxbury about 1634, and says "When he landed it gave him a dreadfull shock, for was brought up delicately and left a delightful country, and here he found himself not only in a strange land, but in a frightful wilderness and destitute of any of the comforts of life.--saw no way to get a living but to go to work, though he was not brought up to any kind of labor. He was so full of trouble that he shed tears bountifully, which so moved the captain of the vessel that he offered to carry him back again, but he said, "No, I will never go back."