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Robert I the Bruce, King of Scotland

Robert I the Bruce, King of Scotland

Male 1274 - 1329  (54 years)

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  • Name Robert I the Bruce, King of Scotland 
    Born 11 Jul 1274  Writtle, Exsex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Jun 1329  Cardross, Dunbartonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Abbey Church, Dunferline, Fifeshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I27099  Lucius
    Last Modified 19 May 2005 

    Father Robert de Brus, 6th Lord of Annandale,   b. 1253, Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jan 1304, Holy Land Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Mother Marjorie (Margaret), Countess of Carrick 
    Married Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F10951  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Isabel, Countess of Mar,   d. 1296 
    Married 1295 
    Children 
     1. Marjorie Bruce, of Scotland,   b. 1296, Dundonald, Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Mar 1316, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
    Family ID F10949  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Elizabeth de Burgh 
    Children 
     1. David II Bruce, King of Scotland,   b. 5 Mar 1324, Dunfermline Palace, Fife Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1371  (Age 46 years)
     2. (--?--) Bruce
     3. (--?--) Bruce
     4. John the Bruce
    Family ID F11104  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Headstones
     Robert Bruce at Stirling Castle
    Robert Bruce at Stirling Castle

    Histories
    he Great Hall, built 1503
    he Great Hall, built 1503
    The Palace, built for James V in 1538
    The Palace, built for James V in 1538
    Mary of Guise, her mother, continued to live at Stirling after the child had gone to France for safety and the defences of the castle were strengthened during this time of religious change. The French Spur and parts of the outer walls date from this time. Mary Stewart eventually married the Dauphin, briefly becoming Queen of France before her…
    Stirling Castle Gatehouse, built for James IV c1500
    Stirling Castle Gatehouse, built for James IV c1500
    It was James IV who started to create the castle we see today, turning Stirling into a brilliant court where splendid entertainments were held and he gained a reputation in Europe as a true Renaissance King. He built the Inner Close, the King's Old Building, the Great Hall and the Forework, seen below.

    Stirling Castle - Gate House
    Stirling Castle…
    Stirling Castle's Outer Defences 1708-14
    Stirling Castle's Outer Defences 1708-14
    It was James IV who started to create the castle we see today, turning Stirling into a brilliant court where splendid entertainments were held and he gained a reputation in Europe as a true Renaissance King. He built the Inner Close, the King's Old Building, the Great Hall and the Forework, seen below.
    Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn
    Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn
    Robert I the Bruce, King of Scots
    Robert I the Bruce, King of Scots

  • Notes 
    • Robert Bruce 1274-1329
      King Robert I

      Bruce, Wallace and the Scottish Wars

      The period 1296-7 saw a series of revolts in the north and southwest, and the emergence of both William Wallace and Robert Bruce the younger, the future king. The revolts have usually been seen as either aristocratic, inspired by the supporters of Bruce cause, i.e. Robert Bruce, James Stewart and Robert Wishart, or as spontaneous ‘popular’ revolts led by William Wallace and Andrew Moray.

      Compared to the Stuart and Moray families who had all lost power because of Edward I and were both justifiably resentful of this English administration in Scotland, it is rather more difficult to explain the involvement of Robert Bruce, the future King. Bruce had been exiled by the Scottish government after refusing to swear fealty to Balliol and had been on Edward I’s side at the outbreak of the Scottish Wars. The fact that Edward I showed no inclination to reward the Bruces with any political responsibilities in Scotland might have persuaded him to join the revolt in the southwest after it started.

      Edward I’s concentration during this period was distracted by the greater priority he placed upon his campaign against the French in Flanders. In late June 1297 he even asked the Comyn family (whom he had imprisoned in England) to not only assist him in Flanders but also quell the revolt in Scotland. They pretended to agree and late in 1297 openly came out in the support of the rebellion. Early in 1298 the Comyns deserted the English army in Flanders to join Moray and Wallace. The combined forces of Wallace and Moray won a famous victory over English forces at Stirling Bridge on 11 September 1297. The battle took place on ground now built over but the general site can be viewed from Stirling Castle. The bridge that gives its name to the battle was a wooden one close to the present ‘old bridge’, which was built in the sixteenth century and is still used by pedestrians.